Search found 22 matches

by Cwalster
Thu May 02, 2013 9:59 pm
Forum: Member Projects
Topic: Cutting small Logo into oak, Which bit to purchase
Replies: 8
Views: 2475

Re: Cutting small Logo into oak, Which bit to purchase

I'd go with an engraving bit. It's got a lot more "meat" to the actual cutting portion, and as such can withstand a lot more punishment. I've seen one engrave through a .625" cast aluminum plate at work. At the same time, those small endmills tend to be very finicky, and you generally wont know they...
by Cwalster
Wed Mar 20, 2013 5:15 pm
Forum: Design Ideas
Topic: Vacuum clamps
Replies: 4
Views: 1750

Re: Vacuum clamps

Venturis usually require a fairly high amount of compressed air. I would contact the seller about the cfm requirement before you start sizing your compressor.
by Cwalster
Sat Feb 23, 2013 1:20 am
Forum: Other - (etchers, drag knifes, lasers)
Topic: Foam cutting?
Replies: 5
Views: 4658

Re: Foam cutting?

depends on what your doing. If you doing complex surfacing, a hot wire won't do. Melting may also not yield the correct surfacing either.

I machine EPS and EPP all day long, and the trick is to use HSS, flat end mills and to conventionally cut it. If you don't you get a fuzzy surface.
by Cwalster
Sat Feb 09, 2013 2:24 am
Forum: Lounge
Topic: New to cnc
Replies: 3
Views: 1307

Re: New to cnc

All those machines are based off the same language of code: G-code. Some, slightly different flavors, but all boil down to the same thing. All of them are going to be programmed and operated in the same way. If you don't have a background in machining or engineering, be prepared for many hours and a...
by Cwalster
Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:00 am
Forum: Discussion
Topic: Engraving aluminum. What did I do wrong?
Replies: 2
Views: 919

Re: Engraving aluminum. What did I do wrong?

Lower SFM yes, however that cutter is so incredibly small you want it to be spinning incredibly fast. Was the cutter gumming up? filling with aluminum? The no lube is screaming built up edge to me. Other idea could be your trying to take too much of a bite at once and flexing your gantry. Try runnin...
by Cwalster
Mon Feb 04, 2013 11:47 pm
Forum: Discussion
Topic: Cutting wood veneer
Replies: 4
Views: 983

Re: Cutting wood veneer

another option would be to sandwich it between some thin plywood. Bit more expensive, but you won't get the veneer sticky. should be reusable too if your doing multiples.
by Cwalster
Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:09 pm
Forum: Discussion
Topic: Toggle clamps, 27kg holding force sufficient?
Replies: 1
Views: 568

Re: Toggle clamps, 27kg holding force sufficient?

For.light cutting forces, like wood and plastic, it should suffice by itself. For metals, I would add dowels to prevent it from sliding. Although, with the small cutters a shapeoko uses, you'll probably be fine.

We actually use these in the manner you describe at work.
by Cwalster
Sat Jan 26, 2013 8:57 pm
Forum: Discussion
Topic: Chips and dust - suck or blow?
Replies: 16
Views: 5409

Re: Chips and dust - suck or blow?

Milling aluminum dry will work just fine, however your tool life is going to suffer drastically. If its occasional work just invest is a spray bottle of light oil and spritz the endmill every so often. It doesn't take much.
by Cwalster
Sat Jan 26, 2013 5:01 pm
Forum: Discussion
Topic: Chips and dust - suck or blow?
Replies: 16
Views: 5409

Re: Chips and dust - suck or blow?

Aluminum LOVES coolant. It needs the lubrication from the coolant to prevent the aluminum from building up on the tool. Brass, steel, and high-temp alloys are what usually get run dry.
by Cwalster
Sat Jan 26, 2013 3:48 pm
Forum: Discussion
Topic: Chips and dust - suck or blow?
Replies: 16
Views: 5409

Re: Chips and dust - suck or blow?

I do not know the actual flow rates, as I do not work in a steel shop. However, you use coolant to 1. remove chips from your cutting area, 2. provide lubricant, and 3. cool your workpiece, in that order. Cooling your part is actually fairly low on your priority list. Therefore, you need just enough ...