Which parts do I tap and where?

RGPFX
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Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2013 5:58 pm

Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by RGPFX » Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:41 pm

Hi,

Perhaps I'm being dense, but I find it very confusing as to which parts I am to tap, and which ends to do so. It clearly tells you to tap the Z-axis slide before assembly, but there is some obvious screw-on connections elsewhere to the slides and that is not implicitly mentioned.

I believe it would be helpful if a preparatory step included the instruction for all the taps to be done at one time. Perhaps this could be added to the documentation at a future date. Until then, please list for me, and any other confused individuals, all of the M5 taps that need to be performed.

My thanks for your help.

RGP

Enraged
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by Enraged » Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:43 pm

When I built my Shapeoko 1, I tapped all of the holes in the ends of the Makerslide. Even if it doesn't call for it, it's probably worth doing simply so you don't have to disassemble the machine in the future to tap a hole.

jacob32123
Posts: 96
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by jacob32123 » Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:54 pm

For the stock Shapeoko 2, I had to tap all of the holes in the 500mm makerslide (16 total), and both holes (2) on one end of the 200mm piece.

Dawn18
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Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 8:42 pm
Location: UK

Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by Dawn18 » Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:58 pm

Others have explained well so I won't try to explain more but I just wanted to say, don't be afraid of tapping. When I first read about it there was so much stuff about broken taps and all sorts of horror stories, so when I began I was a nervous wreck :lol: Anyway I soon realised that it was not as hard as I first though. The only things I will say is to try to keep the tap straight when you start off and don't press down hard as once the tap 'bites' it works in quite easily. I also put a piece of tape on the tap at the depth of where I wanted it to go so that I knew that I was deep enough. Hope this helps a little.

Enraged
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by Enraged » Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:11 pm

Also, never try to tap the hole to its final depth all at once. What I mean is, start the tap in the hole, and turn it a few times. Then back off half a turn. Then tap a few turns, stop, back off half a turn, repeat. This breaks the chips, which is usually why people break taps. They try tapping all at once, and it gets harder and harder to turn, and eventually the tap breaks, and your stuck with a broken tap in your makerslide. Not fun. Also, USE lubrication. You can use tapping fluid, motor oil, etc.

cvoinescu
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by cvoinescu » Thu Mar 13, 2014 9:34 pm

Today I tried something new: a thread-forming tap. I had to drill out the holes from 4.2 mm to 4.5 mm, which was no big deal, and the tapping itself was a breeze. One puff of cutting oil, then zoom all the way in in one go with the cordless drill, back out, done! No chips to worry about, and I can easily thread 20-25 mm deep in seconds. I've done only six holes today, but it is clearly easier than the thread-cutting tap, even though there are two steps. The downside is that the tap costs a little more.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

RGPFX
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by RGPFX » Sun Mar 16, 2014 3:25 am

Thank you everyone for your replies. I was not too terrified by the horror stories as I have tapped open holes in the past, but it would be helpful to do it all at once rather than having to figure out from surrounding context what I should have already done. I urge the more experienced hands here to add this information to the instructional sequence wiki.

Thanks again,

RGP

WillAdams
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by WillAdams » Sun Mar 16, 2014 12:06 pm

http://docs.shapeoko.com/tips.html now says:
(after mentioning two practice holes on the Z-axis) All of the other pieces of MakerSlide must have all four holes tapped, and those tapped holes will be needed to assemble the machine.
http://docs.shapeoko.com/zaxis.html says:
Note: You will need to have at least your Z-axis MakerSlide tapped before completing this step. It is probably best to begin tapping well in advance of needing parts, so as to ensure that one works slowly, carefully and patiently at tapping, especially if one initially lacks experience at it.
http://docs.shapeoko.com/gantry.html now says:
Note: At least two pieces of MakerSlide must have threads in it, cut by tapping. If you have not yet finished tapping at least two pieces MakerSlide, you can put this off no longer.
http://docs.shapeoko.com/yaxis.html now says:
Note: The remaining two pieces of MakerSlide must have threads in it, cut by tapping. If you have not yet finished tapping your MakerSlide, you can put this off no longer.
Shapeoko 3XL #0006 w/Makita RT0701 Router w/0.125″ and ¼″ Elaire precision collets
Nomad 883 Pro #596 (bamboo)

RGPFX
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by RGPFX » Sun Mar 16, 2014 6:55 pm

Brilliant!

Nigel K Tolley
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Re: Which parts do I tap and where?

Post by Nigel K Tolley » Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:25 pm

cvoinescu wrote:Today I tried something new: a thread-forming tap. I had to drill out the holes from 4.2 mm to 4.5 mm, which was no big deal, and the tapping itself was a breeze. One puff of cutting oil, then zoom all the way in in one go with the cordless drill, back out, done! No chips to worry about, and I can easily thread 20-25 mm deep in seconds. I've done only six holes today, but it is clearly easier than the thread-cutting tap, even though there are two steps. The downside is that the tap costs a little more.
You also get a tougher thread as it gets work hardened by the thread forming. A definite boon if doing production, too, as no swarf or chips, & the tap itself is physically stronger as it doesn't need so much metal removed for the chips to clear.

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