Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

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jointhebeagle
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Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by jointhebeagle » Tue Mar 29, 2016 1:56 pm

I know not all of them are, but from what I see as I'm shopping, anything .8kw and above are at 220v.

This seems awfully excessive, but I have no idea what I'm talking about.

Can someone please elaborate.
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Auarhau
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Re: Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by Auarhau » Tue Mar 29, 2016 2:31 pm

I don't know either, but ~220V is the most used mains voltage worldwide by a large margin. http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricit ... y-country/
So I would be more surprised if it was the opposite ;)
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jointhebeagle
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Re: Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by jointhebeagle » Tue Mar 29, 2016 2:55 pm

Auarhau wrote:~220V is the most used mains voltage worldwide by a large margin. http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricit ... y-country/
So I would be more surprised if it was the opposite ;)
I bet that's why. I had no idea.
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superfrog
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Re: Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by superfrog » Wed May 04, 2016 1:10 pm

Most of the spindles themselves seem to be rated for 220V too; I assume they mean that the coils are optimised for driving pulses at around this potential. On a 220V AC system, that would save a boost controller and let you get away with straight rectification (Which would give terrible power factor, but I don't think they care much on small VFD)

All the above is pure guesswork but having researched the use of RC size motors, I sure wish some I could drive at high voltage existed ( Carrying 100A at 24V for a longish distance is just no fun).
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whimmel
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Re: Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by whimmel » Wed May 04, 2016 7:40 pm

In places where there's 220v at the plug, does that mean the service from the pole is 440v?

cvoinescu
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Re: Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by cvoinescu » Thu May 05, 2016 1:53 am

whimmel wrote:In places where there's 220v at the plug, does that mean the service from the pole is 440v?
No. The typical arrangement in Europe is three-phase wye, 230 V* to neutral each, 400 V between phases. All but the largest houses get one phase (230 V); very large houses, apartment buildings with many units, schools, dorms and office buildings, farms, and small industrial buildings get all three phases. High-leg delta and split-phase are unheard of**.

There are no "pole pigs": instead, much larger transformers on the ground, fenced off or inside a dedicated building, step down medium-voltage (3 to 10 kV) to three-phase low-voltage 230/400 V, which then gets distributed to many houses in the neighborhood. Larger buildings (e.g. hospitals) may have their own transformers. In the UK, for instance, both the medium-voltage and the low-voltage lines are underground in the built-up areas, even in many rural settings (and so are telephone cables and cable television cables, except the last few meters of telephone cable, which goes up a pole to a junction box, and then to a number of houses). In less developed European countries, the electricity supply is underground in dense urban areas, but in less dense urban areas only the medium-voltage lines are underground, with the low-voltage network on poles, typically in a five-conductor bundle in newer installations (three phases, neutral, and the switchable phase for street lighting supply), separate conductors otherwise. A small village would have a single transformer.

* It used to be 220/380 V in some European countries, 230/400 V in others, and 240/415 V in the UK; this has been harmonized to a nominal 230/400 V across Europe, although, in practice, the actual voltages haven't changed.

** The one notable exception is 110 V split-phase (2 x 55 V) used for power tools on building sites in the UK, for extra safety.
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whimmel
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Re: Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by whimmel » Thu May 05, 2016 3:07 pm

cvoinescu wrote:
whimmel wrote:In places where there's 220v at the plug, does that mean the service from the pole is 440v?
No. The typical arrangement in Europe is three-phase wye, 230 V* to neutral each, 400 V between phases. All but the largest houses get one phase (230 V); very large houses, apartment buildings with many units, schools, dorms and office buildings, farms, and small industrial buildings get all three phases. High-leg delta and split-phase are unheard of**.
Thanks. I was curious how the breaker panels would be set up since in the US they try to balance the load between the two legs of 220.

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Re: Why are all the VFD-required spindles 220v?

Post by cvoinescu » Thu May 05, 2016 5:00 pm

Yeah, here they normally try to balance a group of houses. Unless you have three phases, in which case they try to balance all three. Not much different, except the main switch has one extra pole. :)
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