Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

discussion of design changes / improvements / suggestions
Improbable Construct
Posts: 997
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:21 am
Location: Fairhope, AL
Contact:

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by Improbable Construct » Sat Mar 02, 2013 12:37 am

Ahh...
I knew I forgot something.
I was running a .25 mm pass depth.
Shapeoko #Classified some of the bolts may be original parts.
Shapeoko 1 # ???? Stainless plates, still in the box.
Shapeoko 2 # 3926 not stock
Shapeoko 3 # 0003
Store:
http://ImprobableConstruct.com
Twitter:
https://twitter.com/ImprblConstruct

potatotron
Posts: 135
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2012 12:47 am
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by potatotron » Sat Mar 02, 2013 1:21 am

Very impressive. Can't wait to see it in action.

levlandau2
Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2012 1:52 am
Location: Minneapolis, MN, USA

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by levlandau2 » Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:17 pm

Wow, that is super cool. You are so far ahead. Do you have any details on the CF??

1) Where did you buy it?
2) Is it hard to mill? I have heard CF dulls endmills?
3) How do you manage the dust? I am think CF dust is ultra bad for lungs and shop?

Awesome otherwise, I am trying to do all the stuff you are doing, but am way behind :-).

Improbable Construct
Posts: 997
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:21 am
Location: Fairhope, AL
Contact:

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by Improbable Construct » Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:56 pm

levlandau2 wrote:Wow, that is super cool. You are so far ahead. Do you have any details on the CF??

1) Where did you buy it?
2) Is it hard to mill? I have heard CF dulls endmills?
3) How do you manage the dust? I am think CF dust is ultra bad for lungs and shop?

Awesome otherwise, I am trying to do all the stuff you are doing, but am way behind :-).
1) eBay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/170985902803
2) It seemed to mill pretty easy, but yes it did tear up a couple endmills.
3) I have a dust shoe on my DW660 and I wore a dust mask rated for fiberglass when I was running the machine. If you have ever repaired a surfboard, it smelled like that.
Shapeoko #Classified some of the bolts may be original parts.
Shapeoko 1 # ???? Stainless plates, still in the box.
Shapeoko 2 # 3926 not stock
Shapeoko 3 # 0003
Store:
http://ImprobableConstruct.com
Twitter:
https://twitter.com/ImprblConstruct

dointhangs
Posts: 179
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 7:31 pm

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by dointhangs » Sun Mar 03, 2013 5:22 pm

Hey IC I have a methods question about how you handle going back and slightly modifying jobs. Like how you described milling out the bearing hole slightly so the bearing would fit. Did you check that fit while it was still in the bed and you knew exactly where your shapeoko was in x/y/z space from looking at the gcode at the end of the file? Do you have any tricks for that if you have to just do it if the piece has been remounted or if the gantry has moved?
Shapeoko #298, dual drive upgrade, acme z axis, open bed endplates and a slightly larger ("expanded desktop") work area!

Improbable Construct
Posts: 997
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:21 am
Location: Fairhope, AL
Contact:

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by Improbable Construct » Sun Mar 03, 2013 6:23 pm

dointhangs wrote:Hey IC I have a methods question about how you handle going back and slightly modifying jobs. Like how you described milling out the bearing hole slightly so the bearing would fit. Did you check that fit while it was still in the bed and you knew exactly where your shapeoko was in x/y/z space from looking at the gcode at the end of the file? Do you have any tricks for that if you have to just do it if the piece has been remounted or if the gantry has moved?
Here is what I do:
I use Mach3 so once I hit the reset button and lock the motors Mach3 keeps track of the coordinates of the x/y/z axis.
I almost always set my material size to what ever the actual dimensions are. Even if I am just cutting a small piece out of a bigger chunk of material.
I use the corners of the material to find it's center and mark it with an X.
I then jog the machine to center the tool on the X and zero my X and Y axis.
I then use a touch plate to set the Z height.
Now that everything is zeroed I am careful not to unlock the motors. As long as I don't crash the machine Mach3 will always be able to bring the spindle back to X0/Y0/Z0.

So to mill the bearing hole slightly larger, I test fit the bearing, before I cut the outer edge. When it didn't fit I recreated my g-code with a .05 mm offset and re ran it.
When I flipped the bottom block to counter sink the slots I flipped the piece over after it had been cut out and realigned it with the outline cut into the spoil board. I then used a couple of end mills as spacers until I had it locked in place.

As far as tricks go:
1. If I know I am going to have to unlock the motors in the middle of a job I will sometime drill a hole with the end mill at a known spot say X0/Y0/Z0. Then I can drop the bit back into that hole and then re-lock the motors.
2. For awhile I had two blocks of wood fastened in the lower left corner at a 90 degree angle. I would move the spindle until the bit was in that corner and then use that as my X0/Y0/Z0. I would then put my material to be milled in the corner and go from there.
3. As soon as I get my hands on some 1/4" aluminum I am going to make one of these: http://vancura.innovations.home.mchsi.com/p-cnc-ef.htm It is only useful if you have touch probing but something similar could be made with just a 1/8" hole in it that you could drop your bit into.

I hope this answers your questions.
Anybody else have any tips?
Shapeoko #Classified some of the bolts may be original parts.
Shapeoko 1 # ???? Stainless plates, still in the box.
Shapeoko 2 # 3926 not stock
Shapeoko 3 # 0003
Store:
http://ImprobableConstruct.com
Twitter:
https://twitter.com/ImprblConstruct

dointhangs
Posts: 179
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 7:31 pm

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by dointhangs » Sun Mar 03, 2013 7:21 pm

These are good tips, thanks, Your #2, clamping the corner piece could be a good one. I know you use mach3 but does anyone know of a grbl command to lock motors? That would be nice b/c the default for the buildlog motors is unlocked. (Interestingly I noticed a little system of mine that just uses "easy driver" setup for stepper drivers is locked by default). This also touches upon end mill changes mid job. I havent yet done that but I guess my approach would be to lock the motors as best I could and swap bits that way. Sorry if I have missed a post on this.
Shapeoko #298, dual drive upgrade, acme z axis, open bed endplates and a slightly larger ("expanded desktop") work area!

cvoinescu
Posts: 4442
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:50 pm
Location: Camberley, UK
Contact:

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by cvoinescu » Sun Mar 03, 2013 8:37 pm

GRBL 0.8c has $7=255 to keep the motors locked at all times.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

dointhangs
Posts: 179
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 7:31 pm

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by dointhangs » Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:00 pm

OK thanks for that, thats helpful. By the way IC I have been working on upgrading my machine this weekend but all of my efforts just seem "so 2012" after these posts of yours lately :-)
Shapeoko #298, dual drive upgrade, acme z axis, open bed endplates and a slightly larger ("expanded desktop") work area!

cvoinescu
Posts: 4442
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:50 pm
Location: Camberley, UK
Contact:

Re: Carbon Fiber Plates and Aluminum Bearing Blocks

Post by cvoinescu » Sun Mar 03, 2013 9:43 pm

I think Improbable Construct would make a lot of money selling these carbon fiber upgrade plates, even though my feeling is that, in practice, they're only a little more useful than go-fast decals. They're just too cool.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

Post Reply