spindle choice

Post Reply
chris33
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat May 25, 2013 6:36 pm

spindle choice

Post by chris33 » Thu Sep 11, 2014 11:09 am

Im abit stumped on spindle choices im going to be mainly working with wood and plastics and ocassionally aluminium wood a 600w dc spindle be ok
Prusa i3 3d printer
Shapeoko 2 Serial Number 5856

Blog : http://3dimtech.blogspot.co.uk

WillAdams
Posts: 8514
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:11 pm
Location: Pennsylvania --- south of the Turnpike, East of US-15
Contact:

Re: spindle choice

Post by WillAdams » Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:08 pm

All of the materials which you mention can be cut w/ the stock 120 Watt spindle ( http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Materials ), so a 600 Watt unit should be ``okay''.

Spindle choice seems to be driven by the following concerns:

- low runout --- this drives purchasing a higher cost unit and is necessary for some which which requires accuracy such as printed circuit boards
- more torque --- having more torque allows for lower RPM cutting which extends tool life
- collet convenience --- the higher-end spindles use industry-standard collets such as ER-11 which make changing bits easier
- more power
- availability of mounts and vacuum collection options --- this seems to be driving the popularity of the DW660

What people have shared is on the wiki: http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Spindle_Options (except for anything I missed or couldn't find in searching --- additions and corrections would be welcome.
Shapeoko 3XL #0006 w/Makita RT0701 Router w/0.125″ and ¼″ Elaire precision collets
Nomad 883 Pro #596 (bamboo)

cvoinescu
Posts: 4442
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:50 pm
Location: Camberley, UK
Contact:

Re: spindle choice

Post by cvoinescu » Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:22 pm

WillAdams wrote:All of the materials which you mention can be cut w/ the stock 120 Watt spindle
Yes they can be, just not very well.

My personal favorite is the Makita RT0700C (RT0701C in the US), except for the fact that you'd need to buy a 1/8" collet for it ($$), or use an adapter sleeve (not ideal). It has good speed control that goes down to 10,000 rpm, which is good news when milling plastic. And it's powerful enough to make short work of cutting wood with a 1/4" endmill. It's made of a lot of aluminium and it's tall and narrow, as opposed to the (also very good) Bosch Colt, which is mostly plastic, has no speed control, and it's fatter so it sits further away from the X axis. At 1.4 kg or so, the Makita is heavy, at the upper limit of what I'd feel comfortable with on the machine. Unfortunately, on the Shapeoko 2, the top will not clear the Z motor unless you moved the spindle further away from the Z carriage, negating the advantage its relative slimness.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

Schruminator
Posts: 259
Joined: Wed Oct 30, 2013 1:04 pm
Location: Littleton, CO
Contact:

Re: spindle choice

Post by Schruminator » Thu Sep 11, 2014 1:10 pm

For what it is worth, I bought a Dewalt DW611 that does not come with an 1/8" collet. I bought a cheap 1/4 --> 1/8 adapter for something like $5 and it works like a champ. I have no measurable runout as near as I can tell. My 0.125" diameter endmill is cutting a 0.125" wide path.
1.8m x 1.0m SO2 #3638 / Vectric Aspire / ACME Z-axis / View my photography at http://www.mschrum.com

CastIrony
Posts: 650
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2014 10:21 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Re: spindle choice

Post by CastIrony » Thu Sep 11, 2014 10:16 pm

cvoinescu wrote:
WillAdams wrote:All of the materials which you mention can be cut w/ the stock 120 Watt spindle
Yes they can be, just not very well.

My personal favorite is the Makita RT0700C (RT0701C in the US), except for the fact that you'd need to buy a 1/8" collet for it ($$), or use an adapter sleeve (not ideal). It has good speed control that goes down to 10,000 rpm, which is good news when milling plastic. And it's powerful enough to make short work of cutting wood with a 1/4" endmill. It's made of a lot of aluminium and it's tall and narrow, as opposed to the (also very good) Bosch Colt, which is mostly plastic, has no speed control, and it's fatter so it sits further away from the X axis. At 1.4 kg or so, the Makita is heavy, at the upper limit of what I'd feel comfortable with on the machine. Unfortunately, on the Shapeoko 2, the top will not clear the Z motor unless you moved the spindle further away from the Z carriage, negating the advantage its relative slimness.
Is the motor in a router basically the same as the motor in a DC spindle of equivalent power? That Makita looks to be about 1kW, so would it be roughly comparable to a 1kW DC spindle?
Shapeoko 3 #192 - Complete! Needs limit switches.

Estlcam
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2013 3:13 pm
Location: Germany
Contact:

Re: spindle choice

Post by Estlcam » Thu Sep 11, 2014 11:13 pm

Hi,
CastIrony wrote:Is the motor in a router basically the same as the motor in a DC spindle of equivalent power? That Makita looks to be about 1kW, so would it be roughly comparable to a 1kW DC spindle?
The motors are different but performance depends mostly on the electronics rather than motor type in this case. The Makita is a quite professional woodworking tool with a lot of torque over its complete rpm range. However: 10000 rpm as lower limit are still quite high for some applications - e.g. drilling holes.

With DC spindles on the other side you can usually run much lower speeds if needed - but unfortunately with very little torque and further decreasing rpm as soon as load is applied.
This is because most DC spindles are just equipped with open loop pwm controllers that do not monitor rpm and can not increase power if the speed starts to drop due to load.
They achieve maximum power only at maximum rpm and rapidly loose torque at lower speeds.
However: if a DC spindle has closed loop electronics (rare) it can achieve maximum torque even at 0 rpm.

So in most cases the Makita would "win".

Christian
Estlcam CAM and Arduino UNO CNC controller: www.estlcam.com

Post Reply