Workholding with Threaded Inserts

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krayvis
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Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by krayvis » Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:22 am

Hey guys, I know there are already a couple builds showing off T-nuts. I thought I'd share a similar take, but instead using threaded inserts which I think hold better than T-nuts. And I just like the way it looks.



There are pros and cons for everything, you can chime in below. I know that having a metal surface so close to the workpiece can be undesireable if you over-mill and hit it. I usually throw a piece of 6mm ply under my work just to keep my wasteboard in reasonable shape... which might defeat the purpose of it being a wasteboard. Oh well. Let me know your thoughts. :)

twforeman
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by twforeman » Thu Jan 30, 2014 1:32 am

Threaded inserts are a cool way to go, no doubt.

I don't consider it a "waste" board on my machine. It's the bed. And I always put a "waste" board down if I'm going to be milling through.
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lordmundi
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by lordmundi » Thu Jan 30, 2014 2:09 am

very nice video! thanks for sharing.

chomdh
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by chomdh » Thu Jan 30, 2014 2:31 am

Excellent video. I really appreciate the helpful tips for using inkscape and makerCAM. I'm still waiting on all my parts to arrive but have made some code with makerCAM that was done using metric dimensions. Looks like I'll be redoing that code before I send it to the machine.
Thank you, now I'm going back to watch your previous videos.
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halfnormal
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by halfnormal » Thu Jan 30, 2014 3:15 am

Great info!

Any chance you can post a link to the inserts and sample code?

Brian
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by Brian » Thu Jan 30, 2014 5:39 am

Actually inventables just released a "wasteboard" with the threaded inserts and a layout grid. I just placed the order for mine, Ill report back once its arrived and installed

https://www.inventables.com/technologie ... ed-inserts
Brian
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krayvis
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Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 10:25 pm

Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by krayvis » Thu Jan 30, 2014 10:23 pm

Yea, the pre-made wasteboard is actually pretty reasonably priced. I saw that before I made mine but I just really wanted to make my own for the sake of experience and practice. And for the 1/4-20 hardware.

Chomdh, one of the people on the Shapeoko forums has shared code to trim decimals in GCode which you can try. I will try to find the link again later and post it here unless you can find it first. But that's probably the easiest option if your parts take more than 5 minutes to setup in MakerCAM.

EDIT: --> http://www.shapeoko.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=33&t=1562

Here's the threaded insert I got from McMaster: http://www.mcmaster.com/#92105a100/=qhbi42

But after seeing the brand (EZ-Lok), I'm pretty sure you can also find them on Amazon and such for slightly cheaper. Maybe: http://amzn.to/1bbeWi9 ? Double check dimensions to make sure it suits your needs before buying.

Posted a piece of sample code below, feed rates are on the conservative side. Good luck, have fun.
test_1holeSLO.nc
Simple Hole Test
(19.26 KiB) Downloaded 365 times
four hole.svg.zip
Four Hole Pattern
(1.43 KiB) Downloaded 426 times

halfnormal
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by halfnormal » Fri Jan 31, 2014 3:42 am

krayvis, thanks for the information and quick reply.

bmsleight
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by bmsleight » Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:51 pm

Hi krayvis,

Great video. Well shot - that is about 20 tips for a newbie like me sprinkled across the video. The end presentation of the video was very cool, love it.

Thanks very much for sharing. I think I may end up wathcing this one more than most and taking notes.

Cheers,
Brendan

Note to self: 3m30s setting in inches - avoid metric!

cvoinescu
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Re: Workholding with Threaded Inserts

Post by cvoinescu » Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:40 am

Krayvis, I have watched your video and enjoyed it. I have just two little comments about it.

Many people mill a fraction of a millimeter into the wasteboard when they cut their parts. You want any metal (T-nuts, threaded inserts) to be at least a millimeter below the top of the wasteboard, to avoid hitting it with the endmill. Or, you can treat the bed as permanent (non-consumable), and always add a waste sheet under the workpiece, like I've seen you doing. A sheet of MDF with the same hole pattern as the workholding table would come in handy (or several -- say, a small one, a medium-sized one, and one the size of the bed that's used only for full-size jobs; when one becomes too tattered, just mill another one).

The paper method of finding the zero height works great, but there's one that's almost as quick and more accurate: instead of sliding a sheet of paper, try to roll a cylinder of known diameter -- say, the shank of another 1/8" endmill -- under your tool. Jog the Z until the cylinder barely touches the tool as you roll it under it. Tell the machine that the Z coordinate is now the known diameter of the cylinder, and you're set (for example G92 Z3.175). When you don't need the accuracy, as in your case, the paper method is indeed quicker.
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