My first "real" project

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tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

My first "real" project

Post by tjshape » Thu Nov 13, 2014 4:00 am

I've had the Shapeoko2 now for just over 1 month. What a great way to spend my free time! Here is the first "real" item I've made on the thing, which I was commissioned to do by a friend after he saw a posting to my Facebook account of a very basic sign I made when first tuning the CNC. It feels weird selling something I made - but hey, it'll pay for more Shapeoko upgrades!

I designed the whole project in Inkscape, used Makercam to generate the tool paths, and the universal g-code sender to control the CNC. For milling, I used a 1.6mm fishtail bit I picked up at invetables - very pleased with the performance. I currently have my machine set up with a Dewalt DW660, which is a HUGE improvement over the stock spindle which came with it (and broke nearly instantly) and also a huge improvement over my Dremel 4000.

For the main piece (maple), I used a pretty big pocket cut to allow the "The Hanson Family" to stand out. I then used a nicely contrasting stain to make the letters pop even more. I haven't chosen a sealer/polish/wax yet, so feel free to make suggestions. For the frame (reclaimed barn wood cedar), I did another pocket cut which allowed me to inlay the main sign. I made it so I can press the maple sign into the barn wood sign without using glue, allowing it to be removed (with some prying) in case the barn wood ends up not working with the decor of their house. For those wondering what the "A&E" logo is in there for, their names start with A and E. I have a little more clean-up yet to do on it, but for all intents and purposes, it's done.

I'd be lying if I said it this project worked on the first try - more like after 10 tries... Tries 1-9 identified deficiencies in my project design and/or my workmanship in setting up the machine. I have to say though, with all those failed attempts, I learned a ton about what to do, not to do, and a whole lot more. I gotta say, a little win now and then goes a heck of a long way. Anyway, I am pretty happy with the way this one turned out. :)
front sign.jpg
front sign.jpg (95.97 KiB) Viewed 3174 times
angle sign.jpg
angle sign.jpg (96.7 KiB) Viewed 3174 times
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

zerblatt007
Posts: 196
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 7:48 am
Location: Bergen, Norway
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Re: My first "real" project

Post by zerblatt007 » Thu Nov 13, 2014 8:23 am

Very nice both design and finish.. :)
This must have taken some time to mill out - and 10 times too?
Shapeoko #958: Dual-Y drive, Double-X, Belt on outside, 1m Y-Axis, Acme Z, Opened up and boxed in. Kress 1050 Spindle.

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: My first "real" project

Post by tjshape » Thu Nov 13, 2014 1:15 pm

Thanks! With the 1.6mm bit and a 1500mm feedrate dropping 1.5mm per pass, it took a little over 2 hours.

But yeah, the other 9 times sure was starting to wear on me. One thing I did learn was that it's not a bad idea to split the job up into several smaller jobs when possible.
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

Camel
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2014 11:07 pm

Re: My first "real" project

Post by Camel » Fri Nov 14, 2014 1:02 am

That looks beautiful. How did you apply the stain to the letters and not have it drip all over - like it always does for me?

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: My first "real" project

Post by tjshape » Fri Nov 14, 2014 1:43 am

Camel wrote:That looks beautiful. How did you apply the stain to the letters and not have it drip all over - like it always does for me?
Thanks Camel! For staining on items that require clean lines or where drips are not an option, I cheat and use a stain pen/marker like this:
http://m.homedepot.com/p/Minwax-1-3-oz- ... /100376125
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

Dhpenner1
Posts: 97
Joined: Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:30 pm

Re: My first "real" project

Post by Dhpenner1 » Sat Nov 15, 2014 10:19 am

That's really nice. I've been tossing around some ideas for a sign like that aswell. I was thinking about staining or painting the pre milled piece of wood in specific areas to have a multi coloured sign with crisp edges. Have to do some testing to see if it'll work before attempting a big piece.

I would look into spray on lacquer for a finish on that one.

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: My first "real" project

Post by tjshape » Sat Nov 15, 2014 12:53 pm

Dhpenner1 wrote:That's really nice. I've been tossing around some ideas for a sign like that aswell. I was thinking about staining or painting the pre milled piece of wood in specific areas to have a multi coloured sign with crisp edges. Have to do some testing to see if it'll work before attempting a big piece.

I would look into spray on lacquer for a finish on that one.
Good thought on pre-staining the piece. I'm going to have to try that.

Thanks for the finishing tip as well - I'm still debating what to use and have tried out several on my various failed pieces, but not lacquer yet. Looks like that's in my future. :-)
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

Woodworker
Posts: 639
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 1:37 am
Location: 5 miles north of Benson, NC

Re: My first "real" project

Post by Woodworker » Sat Nov 15, 2014 8:45 pm

Here is a piece of walnut that was sprayed with aluminum colored paint and then milled with an up cut spiral bit.
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BRuce - SO2 #4798 - IC's Z axis upgrade, customized Z rail and Z motor mount, spindle Dewalt 611

ALuomala
Posts: 136
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:30 pm
Location: Alberta, Canada

Re: My first "real" project

Post by ALuomala » Sun Nov 16, 2014 12:12 am

Camel wrote:That looks beautiful. How did you apply the stain to the letters and not have it drip all over - like it always does for me?
One way I managed to apply paint was to dab it on with a cloth that had a foam piece behind it (make sure that you dab/blot the applicator on a scrap piece of something beforehand so that your applicator has a thin layer of paint, not gobs of it).

Another way I had thought of, but not yet tried out, was to have the project piece upside down (i.e facing downward) and then use a roller of some form with a very light amount of paint on it, and apply numerous light coats to the surface, thereby not allowing any paint to be forced by gravity onto unwanted areas. I'm sure that the same thing could be done with the piece right side up, as long as you keep the amount of paint being applied very light.

Any time that I have tried applying paint/stain to a surface before hand has ended up being a waste of time/resources, as I ended up ruining the project in some manner (too deep of cuts, etc) and having to either start again or removing the painted surface (planing it down, so to speak, to start with a clean surface). Down the road, once my skillz have improved, I will likely re-visit that technique, but for now, I anticipate making too many mistakes to merit doing that method.

Allan
ShapeOko2, serial ??
DW660 spindle;
Upgrades: 900mm X axis and 1000mm Y axis; ACME Z Axis; modified MDF wasteboard with t-slot
Primary usage: wood crafting (signs, plaques, and ultimately a CNC-made electric guitar)

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