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Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Mon Sep 21, 2015 3:38 pm
by twforeman
Hey! Look! I made something with my Shapeoko again! (It's been a long time since I last made something.)

I made a set of grips for a Star Model B pistol for a friend who is going to paint them. I modeled the grip outside profiles and the fixture in LibreCAD, and the 3D grip surface in Inventor.

G Code was generated using CamBam for the 2.5D work and MeshCAM for the the 3D surfaces.

I did the milling on my Shapeoko 1(Enhanced) because I haven't made the new table for my S3 yet. (Too many other projects in the way.)

Holes were made with an 1/8" straight end mill, the outside profile was cut with a 1/4" two flute router bit and the 3D surface with a 1/4" four flute ball end mill.

Image

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 3:39 am
by jimisbell
I am a new member of this forum. I am a gunsmith. I am interested in getting one of these machines to make pistol grips for 1911s.

Can you, step by step, talk me through the process from an original pistol grip to the new one?

I am a programmer with 40+ years of experience, but have never heard of these languages that you cite.

I dont yet have my machine and am waiting till I find out which would be best for reproducing pistol grips and AK-47 furniture as well as milling aluminum receivers for AR-15s and engraving logos and serial numbers on the steel AK-47 receivers.

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 3:47 am
by WillAdams
G-code is documented on the wiki: http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/G-Code

MeshCAM and CamBam and Inventor are commercial programs: http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/ ... l_Software

LibeCAD is an opensource CAD program: http://librecad.org/

They all work together as documented on: http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Workflow

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 1:37 pm
by twforeman
jimisbell wrote:I am a new member of this forum. I am a gunsmith. I am interested in getting one of these machines to make pistol grips for 1911s.

Can you, step by step, talk me through the process from an original pistol grip to the new one?

I am a programmer with 40+ years of experience, but have never heard of these languages that you cite.

I dont yet have my machine and am waiting till I find out which would be best for reproducing pistol grips and AK-47 furniture as well as milling aluminum receivers for AR-15s and engraving logos and serial numbers on the steel AK-47 receivers.
I make 1911 grips (and others) on my Shapeoko. 1911 grips are easy since they are flat on the back and the drawings are out there for them so creating the CAD models is simple.

A simplified step by step is:

1. Figure out how to create a model of the item in CAD (Computer Aided Design). I usually make a 2D model using LibreCAD for holes, outside profiles and the fixture that I will use to hold the pieces while I mill them. I tend to use Autodesk Inventor for the 3D outside surfaces, which can be tricky to model.

2. Figure out how you are going to hold the parts while you mill them. I have a vise that I use when milling the backs of the blanks. I usually add some locating holes in the back to fit over dowels on the fixture. I tend to make fixtures out of MDF and use the grip mounting screw holes to hold down the parts (if possible.) Double sided tape also works, but I've had it come loose.

3. Generate the G code for your parts using CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing). I primarily use CamBam for the 2D work (holes, profiles, pockets, etc.) and MeshCam or FreeCam - they both do a pretty good job, but FreeCam is free - for the 3D surfaces.

4. Mill the back sides.

5. Mill the front sides.

I have some stuff on my blog about it:

Here is a post about making Ruger MkIII grips: http://timf.anansi-web.com/wp/milling-r ... iii-grips/
Here is a post about making S&W grips: http://timf.anansi-web.com/wp/making-sm ... ver-grips/

Milling AR receivers might be a little ambitious until you have some experience. AK furniture will be interesting to model and fixture. Good luck! I look forward to posts about your progress!

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Sat Oct 17, 2015 11:17 pm
by TomO
Has anyone made a set of grips with checkering on them? If so I would really appreciate it if you would share your process.


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Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 12:26 am
by WillAdams
You can’t cut good quality checking w/ a machine — get the tools and do it by hand.

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 10:00 pm
by twforeman
Checkering is a whole nother skill I want to learn. I have the tools, just not the time or patience right now. I agree that doing it with a machine is not very easy (following contoured surfaces is difficult) and does not produce good results.

I do plan on attempting some laser engraved patterns when I get my Glowforge, but that won't be for a while.

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 4:02 am
by jointhebeagle
twforeman wrote:Checkering is a whole nother skill I want to learn. I have the tools, just not the time or patience right now. I agree that doing it with a machine is not very easy (following contoured surfaces is difficult) and does not produce good results.

I do plan on attempting some laser engraved patterns when I get my Glowforge, but that won't be for a while.
Can you do some sort of faux checkering with, say a 1/16" ball (or even v bit)? Then just run a series of tic tac toe's - with a wide step over it'd probably be reasonably close?

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 11:11 am
by WillAdams
Attempting to fake checkering w/ a router looks bad if not so delicate as to crumble, is so coarse as to be useless.

It's a traditional skill which requires specific and specialized tools.

Re: Star Model B Pistol Grips

Posted: Wed Mar 18, 2020 12:19 pm
by jrweikle
what might be the chance you release the files so I can make my own grips?

Ross