T-Slots or peg holes?

Discussion about Tooling and Fixtures. End Mills, Router Bits, Hold Downs, Fixtures, Etc.
ijv
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 10:41 am

Re: T-Slots or peg holes?

Post by ijv » Sun Nov 15, 2015 10:34 pm

jbc wrote:Thanks ijv,
I was looking for those earlier but couldn't find them.
Once I get my printer repaired and printing I'll try these.
Thanks.
Jbc
Cutting them out of wood on a Shapeoko works really well!

ijv
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 10:41 am

Re: T-Slots or peg holes?

Post by ijv » Sun Nov 15, 2015 10:39 pm

jbc wrote:Thanks ijv,
I was looking for those earlier but couldn't find them.
Once I get my printer repaired and printing I'll try these.
Thanks.
Jbc
Cutting them out of wood on a Shapeoko works really good!

jbc
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 3:15 pm
Location: Visalia, CA
Contact:

Re: T-Slots or peg holes?

Post by jbc » Sun Nov 15, 2015 10:48 pm

ijv wrote:
Cutting them out of wood on a Shapeoko works really good!
DERP!
That makes more sense lol.
I'll start on that now! :lol:

jbc
jbc
VCarvePro 8
3D Printing prototypes
Sketchup
http://www.CaffeineMachine.com

jbc
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 3:15 pm
Location: Visalia, CA
Contact:

Re: T-Slots or peg holes?

Post by jbc » Thu Jan 07, 2016 12:33 am

I ended up having a 1/2" aluminum plate cut and drilled out for me.
It's a pegboard type hold down system rather than a 'T-Slot' system. I found that wooden dowels held the part well without a need to hold the material down from above. The wooden dowels hold the part even when cutting the materials edges. The wooden pegs get cut easily when the bit moves over them and maintain their hold on the material.

I maxed out the speed my machine can cut 1/4" aluminum and didn't experience any material movement with the peg system.
The material is placed against (2 pegs per side) wooden pegs on two sides. On the opposing sides I hammer a wedge between the pegs and the material which holds the part in place really well.
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The pegs can be seen on the left with the plastic wedges on the front and right holding the material.
2.jpg
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I found when slot cutting aluminum you get a lot of noise/squealing from the lack of lubrication.
I installed the Noga mini-cool http://www.amazon.com/Mini-Cool-Nozzle- ... B00208Y57Y droplet system.
The Noga comes with a strong magnet to attach to metal which holds the system in place. I took the magnet off (held on by a screw) and found it fits well between the router and the vacuum shoe I got from KentCNC https://www.kentcnc.net/nc/mini-split-shoe
Here you can see the Loc-Line® flexible hose pointing toward two sides of the bit. The Loc-line is positioned in such a way that it doesn't hit the Y-axis rails on either side.
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Last edited by jbc on Thu Jan 07, 2016 1:00 am, edited 2 times in total.
jbc
VCarvePro 8
3D Printing prototypes
Sketchup
http://www.CaffeineMachine.com

jbc
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 3:15 pm
Location: Visalia, CA
Contact:

Re: T-Slots or peg holes?

Post by jbc » Thu Jan 07, 2016 12:39 am

The tips of the Noga (circled in red) are positioned about 3/8" above the tip of the bit (I cut mostly 1/4" material).
One tip will be set to force only air out at max while the other tip will be set to spray out lubrication. Both can be adjusted independently.
4.jpg
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Here is a side shot showing the Loc-line wrapping around the SO3's stock Dewalt router mount.
(Note the black ball on the Noga. That allows you to start and stop the spray (lube or air).
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The main body of the Noga is held really well between the router and the KentCNC mini dust shoe.
6.jpg
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Last edited by jbc on Thu Jan 07, 2016 1:21 am, edited 3 times in total.
jbc
VCarvePro 8
3D Printing prototypes
Sketchup
http://www.CaffeineMachine.com

jbc
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 3:15 pm
Location: Visalia, CA
Contact:

Re: T-Slots or peg holes?

Post by jbc » Thu Jan 07, 2016 12:50 am

The aluminum bed gives me a solid base that wont be damaged by the wooden pegs and wont be affected by lubrication. I also found I could place that base below the SO3's frame effectively giving me more height for jobs needing taller material.
The scrap peg board material from the hardware store is placed below the material to be cut to act as a waste board so I don't run into the aluminum bed.
A couple of scrap pieces running along two sides (only one piece of scrap peg board shown) lifts the material to be cut above the bed so unless the scrap swells from the lubrication I'll be able to use it multiple times.
The peg board when laid on the aluminum is flush with the steel frame of the SO3 which helps utilize all available cutting area to maximize the SO3's cutting area.

7.jpg
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I might need to go to non-wood peg boards in the future but I have enough of this stuff to last quite awhile.

I also added some larger rubber feet http://www.mcmaster.com/#9540k692/=10kjmfg I got from McMaster-Carr to lift the entire machine off of the table.
I plan on making a little pooling bed to channel any of the lubrication running off of my material/aluminum bed into a container so I keep the mess to a minimum. Maybe I'll be able to filter the lube and re-use.
jbc
VCarvePro 8
3D Printing prototypes
Sketchup
http://www.CaffeineMachine.com

jbc
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 3:15 pm
Location: Visalia, CA
Contact:

Re: T-Slots or peg holes?

Post by jbc » Sat Jan 09, 2016 6:12 pm

One more reason for a peg style hold down.
The aluminum bed I had made has .252 holes placed 1" apart all the way across the entire bed.
This allows me to use material at least 23" X 28" (my ALU bed is placed under SO3's bed so I can slide material from left to right which could take material 23" x infinity"). Larger material is cheaper to buy.

The Peg holes being placed 1" X 1" O.C. allows you to use the peg holes as alignment registers.
For example you could have a part that needs to flip so you can mill both sides. If you secure the material by aligning it to wood dowels in the ALU bed which aligns the part along the 'X' and the 'Y' axis you can drill two 1/4" holes in the material 1" inch apart and drive a wooden peg through the holes into the ALU bed. That way you would have registration holes to keep your part aligned for flipping. The wooden pegs could be milled with your material easily while holding the part in place like a tab.

I have not done this yet but it seems fairly simple.
Anyone have any thoughts?

jbc
jbc
VCarvePro 8
3D Printing prototypes
Sketchup
http://www.CaffeineMachine.com

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