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ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 6:28 pm
by northbear
Finally have a machine put together and thought I would make a build log.

I had the basic initial design done over a year ago, but have made a few changes since then, and due to a variety of reasons it took me over a year to get the bits and pieces pulled together and assembled :oops:.

As stated in the title this is a ShapOko inspired design as I used the Shapoko (V1 at that point) as the starting point and also tried to incorporate many of the tweaks and modifications shown here on the forum (thanks to everyone for sharing!). While there are very few parts that are the same as the ShapeOko (mostly makerslide, v-wheels, etc), most of the design ideas have been seen here before (eShapeOko, V2, etc).

So here it is as designed:
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And a picture of it built:
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I will try to list some of the differences from the ShapeOko
Mechancial:
  • Used two 1800mm pieces of makerslide cut into 635mm for X-axis (double x), 765mm for the Y axis, and three 255mm long z axis pieces four three "quick change spindles"
  • This gives soft limit travel of x=18.75", y=23.875" and z=3.375"
  • Used an extruded aluminum base with the waste board on top - similar to V2 but it used extrusions parallel to the y axis makreslide to tie the front and rear extrusions together into a box and added two cross brases in the middle
  • Added an extra extrusion between the double x which is bolted to the front x-axis makerslide
  • Three pieces of extrusion spaced between the x axis motor mount plates -- one of which mounts the x axis drag chain
  • Stub of extrusion to mount the y axis drag chain
  • Bent stainless steel for y axis support / dust guard - bolted to the y axis makerslide and extrusion base
  • Motor mount plates are of 1/4" aluminum with my own set of hole patterns (all 4 plates are the same)
  • Hole pattern in motor mounts allow for larger distance between z-axis v-wheels (ala eShapeOko)
  • End plate mounts and belt tensioners are 1/4" aluminum
  • Z axis bearing mount is c'bored piece of 3/8" thick aluminum to fit a 1/4" id bearing
  • Lead screw is 3/8-8 2 start ACME thread with the end turned down to 1/4" to fit through the bearing, then tapped for a 1/4" nut, then turned down again to fit the 5mm coupling
  • The purchased ACME nut (made of delrin) is threaded (and then set-screwed) into a block of aluminum which is then bolted through the motor mount plate and into the tapped x axis extrusion spacers
  • GT2 3mm pitch belting, and 18 tooth pulleys
  • Belt on the outside design for both x and y
  • Porter Cable Trim router #7310 (because I already owned it ;) )
  • All aluminum spacers for motors (and z axis v-wheels) with a 13mm OD except z axis (8mm OD)
  • Motor mounts and other plates were made by a machinist friend in his spare time (Part of the reason it took so long is he got really busy this summer)
Electrical:
  • Nema 23 motors for x and y (two motors on y axis)
  • Limit switchs in both directions on all axis (including z axis which was a bit of a trick)
  • Individual TB6560 stepper motor drivers (qty:5 - one for future) withbreakout board
  • LinuxCNC
  • E-stop (from ebay) tied into breakout board
  • Spindle relay (from ebay) tied into breakout board (to automatically turn on and off spindle)
  • Spindle switch have the option to always have the "spindle" on (in case I want to try a 3D printer or laser etc and just need power on all the time at the spindle)
  • 24V 15A power supply (from ebay)
  • All the CNC electronics are housed in the same computer case as the computer running LinuxCNC - It got a bit cramped to work on in places but it fit ;)
  • LED lamp to show when power is on to the CNC :D
I am may be forgetting something, but that is all i can think of right now.

Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 6:33 pm
by northbear
Some pictures of the electronics
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Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 6:35 pm
by northbear
Couple pictures of the machine and the first cut piece (Test for a play shield)
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Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 5:43 am
by Ing Chao
Excellent!!!!

Your version of the 'Oko is a perfect example of what Open Source is about!

Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Mon Dec 09, 2013 4:52 am
by MeanderBolt
Awesome results eh!!!I have been watching Game of Thrones. I am seeing all these great wooden carvings. Seeing yours and chambrot's projects gives me much hope of being able to make some wicked medieval wood carvings.

Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Mon Dec 09, 2013 11:05 am
by WillAdams
MeanderBolt wrote:...hope of being able to make some wicked medieval wood carvings.
Remember, the ShapeOko is limited to 2.5D w/o the use of jigs and fixtures to rotate the workpiece unless you add a 4th axis to allow rotating the tool,so work won't have any undercutting or reliefs to enhance shadows. The rotating bit also tends to break off fine details as seen on the inside of the counter for the tail of the ampersand in chambrot's recent piece.

Doing ``carving'' w/ a rotary tool denies one access to, and interaction w/ the grain of the wood and its figure --- you owe it to yourself to try doing it by hand at least once.

William

A little off topic

Posted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 9:10 pm
by phlamingo
Doing ``carving'' w/ a rotary tool denies one access to, and interaction w/ the grain of the wood and its figure --- you owe it to yourself to try doing it by hand at least once.
Wood carving is one of my other hobbies. Although many carvers use rotary tools (usually high-speed tools like the Foredom, not so much a Dremel), I just enjoy the process with chisels, gouges, and knives too much to do power carving.

If you do try hand carving:
1. If it is not going well, your tools are probably not sharp.
2. For heaven's sake, get some basswood to carve. Don't drive yourself crazy with softwoods like pine, spruce, or fir. The difference in hardness between early wood and late wood in most softwoods will make it unnecessarily difficult to get smooth surfaces or satisfactory details.

Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Sun Dec 15, 2013 3:58 am
by northbear
Thanks for the comments. I havn't done any hand carving at all, but so far using a CNC for "carving" has been great! :)

Another update to the machine. After about two cuts (ok halfway through the first cut), I found I really wanted a dust shoe of some sort. I had ideas for something fancier, but for now I just cut a peice of clear polycarbonate (on the cnc of course), used a section of 1-1/2" PVC drain pipe, some self adhesive craft foam, and lots of zip ties to hold it all together. All the materials I already had at home. As you may be able to tell, the craft foam was from my daughters collection (she didn't mind). When I need to replace it I think I will use standard craft foam with doublesided tape and also be a bit more precise with cutting the "brush" parts attaching to the lexan -- I see a nice gap in the pictures I took :lol:. Despite that it seems to work very well. Pictures below for your enjoyment.
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Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 5:52 pm
by northbear
.03" end mills are sure small! I was taking it slow and didn't break anything, but was curious how fast you could go before it would just snap.
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Re: ShapeOko inspired CNC by Northbear

Posted: Fri Dec 20, 2013 1:29 am
by LTMNO
Very Nice looking machine... well done!