tjshape's build log (Shapeoko 2 and a soundproof enclosure)

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

tjshape's build log (Shapeoko 2 and a soundproof enclosure)

Post by tjshape » Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:23 am

I've been meaning to out this together for a while now, but always get preoccupied.

The Backstory:
I've been wanting to get a CNC for over ten years, but other priorities always came up. I had mainly been focusing my drool on the Shopbots and have watched those slowly, but surely, rise in cost over that same time period. Just over a year ago, I decided it was time to get something and began looking to alternatives to the Shopbots that would at minimum get me started in the world of CNC. I looked at countless kits and desktop solutions and had been talking with my brother who has an extensive background in electronics, programming, and machining. He convinced me me that we could build our own using a bunch of spare parts he had around from a stockpile of old plotters and printers he had laying around and buying just a few items and printing the rest using his 3D printer. Months went by with little progress, mainly because he gets easily distracted. I got impatient and began my quest again, this time finding the Shapeoko 2. I started reading up about it and it was because of this forum that I ended up purchasing one. Other kits out there looked nice, but the user base just didn't seem as extensive or helpful.

The Initial Build
The first days
I purchased the full kit at the end of September in 2014 from Inventables. It arrived two days after ordering and I quickly began to open the packages and assess exactly what I just got myself into.
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The unpacked contents
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I quickly dove in and began to take inventory. It ended up I was missing 1 V-Wheel, so I contacted Inventables and they overnighted my a new one. I must say that I have been thoroughly impressed by their customer service. Aside from that, everything was there and all the motors tested OK, so it was on to assembly.

To get going faster, I dug up my old projector and screen I had stored away and threw the instructions up on the big screen. That worked wonderfully - as did printing out the exploded part views.
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big screen instructions
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Knowing that the precision of the machine depended upon how closely I followed the instructions, I was extremely careful and made certain I didn't glaze over anything (like I normally do with all other instructions). Pieces began going together quickly and the CNC started to take shape. I even enlisted my five year old's help to put together some of it.


I also found a good use for my projector when not using it for Shapeoko instructions. It doesn't get much better than watching the Packers beat the Bears while building my very own CNC! :D
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The Packer Game and the Z Assembly
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After only three nights, the machine was together, and my pen test was complete. For a pen, I used a standard dry erase marker. For the pen holder, I used a spool of solder with the pen fitting snuggly in the center hole which I then taped up with a bunch of electrical tape. Not the prettiest by far, but it worked fantastic and mounted perfectly on the stock spindle mount.


After that, I was beginning to cut. Unfortunately, on only the second job, the spindle that came with the kit literally blew up in my face. Thankfully I was wearing eye protection as the lock nut struck the glasses as it exploded. I contacted Inventables on that one and instead of sending me a new spindle, they gave me some credit to use in their store - basically saying that spindle was a POS - I whole heartedly agree. I had a few Dremels laying around which I dug out and began using while I decided what I wanted to get for the long term.

More gratuitous pics and videos to come - along with some details on my sound deadening enclosure.
Last edited by tjshape on Fri Jan 09, 2015 3:49 am, edited 2 times in total.
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by tjshape » Sat Jan 03, 2015 5:23 am

Here's the fully assembled unit - you'll notice I opted for the upgraded waste board with threaded inserts. I am very happy with that upgrade.
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Fully Assembled
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Once the pen test was complete, I cut a couple of signs for my family which turned out very nicely.
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The first test sign
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After posting the results on Facebook, I had a friend ask if I'd make a sign for him for which he would pay me for. Without hesitation I said "absolutely." Thankfully he didn't need it any time soon, as what happened next caused endless frustration - but in the end it was very well worth it as I learned a ton about the machine because of this project: what to do, and most importantly what not to do.

I cannot stress enough how important it is to square the machine and make certain all electrical connections are clean, and tight. 90% of the issues I encountered were because of something falling into one of those two camps. 9% of the issues I've encountered were due to blatant user error, and the other 1% were due to issues with software. One of the other key takeaways of that project for me was that I should not use Easel - at least not yet. It's simply not ready. I've found that Makercam and UGS are much better suited for me - granting me more control , more features, and being much faster and stable overall.
The end result of that project can be viewed here: http://www.shapeoko.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=4586

The project taught me the ins and outs of the machine. I learned about my axis limits very quickly by making certain I have the software 0 also set to 0,0,0 before starting a job. I learned that there is a lot of dust that is created and it would be a definite necessity to have some sort of dust control/collection system. I learned that the v-wheels like to pick up those dust particles over time to where I would need to consistently clean and maintain them. I learned that my Dremel was not going to allow me to cut through material as fast as I would like. I learned that the Z-Axis plunging too deep was actually being caused by it not raising high enough. I also learned that I would not be able to cut anything after 7pm in my house due to the noise and 2 little kids needing to sleep.

The last one was a CNC killer for me. If I couldn't cut after 7pm, that effectively would put an end to this project for me for a good number of years. The issue became even worse when I decided to upgrade to the Dewily DW660. For those of you with this spindle, you know it's not on the quiet side.

Enter my sound deadening enclosure.
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Sound deadening - the beginning
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Here is the start of the enclosure. After a lot of thinking about the best approach and what materials to use, I opted for 2x4 construction - essentially building a small room that the Shapeoko could live in. There are probably other methods that would work better or would be easier overall, but for me, this one was rather simple to design and piece together. I made the enclosure to fit the standard Shapeoko 2 as I intend to keep this CNC at this size for the long term. At some point I will be getting a larger CNC, but that some point is probably years away and I didn't want to take up the extra space now as space is rather limited in my garage at the moment.

You'll notice that I have soundboard mounted at the top and bottom of the enclosure. That is the same material that is used around here between condo and apartment walls to help isolate sound.
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by tjshape » Sat Jan 03, 2015 5:26 pm

Next, I encased the outside of the frame in the soundboard as well and then sealed all edges with Green Glue Noiseproofing Sealant which I picked up at Menards. (similar to Home Depot/Lowes for those who do not have a Menards)
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Outside Soundboard
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Once that was done, I moved on to insulate the walls using some denim R-13 Ultratouch sound proofing insulation. The insulation also came with insulating strips which are to be mounted on the studs to act as a buffer between the drywall and the studs so even less sound is capable of making it's way through the walls.
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Insulated walls
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Following the insulation step, I completed the inside of the box with more soundboard, using more of the Green Glue Sealant.
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soundboard done and sealed
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Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by tjshape » Sat Jan 03, 2015 6:56 pm

Next, it was time to move on to the drywall. Instead of mounting the drywall directly to the soundboard, I first put in a layer of Green Glue Noiseproofing Compound on all surfaces that the drywall would be in contact with (different than the sealant, but still bought at Menards). More on these compounds can be found here: http://www.greengluecompany.com. Because I had never used this product before, and I didn't build a separate enclosure without the compound to compare the results, I really have no idea if these items helped at all - but I do know that if I hadn't used them, I would have always wondered if the sound reduction level would have been better in the end with it. The sealant/compound didn't add too much to the overall cost, so in my mind it was worth it simply for the piece of mind. Once drywalled, I had a little buddy help me out to make sure the enclosure would be big enough.
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My drywall friend
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With the inside drywall done, I started to add some of my electrical connections. You'll notice in the picture below I have a standard outlet (to be used for a light and the router) and also 2 ports on the side (to be used for the X, Y, and Z axis cables). For the X,Y, and Z ports, I used a combination of amphenol connectors sourced from PartsExpress. found here. I bought 2 females and 2 male version of those. The females were mounted on the inside and the males will be mounted on the outside. The connectors on the wires themselves will be male on the inside and female on the outside. This will allow me to take the Shapeoko out of the enclosure and run it externally without having to rewire much (or anything really). This setup allows me to run the controller external to the enclosure as well, so I don't have to worry so much about heat build up.
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Amphenol connectors
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Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

Atonwa
Posts: 238
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2014 2:54 pm
Location: Corning, NY

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by Atonwa » Sat Jan 03, 2015 10:55 pm

This is great, can't wait to see the finished enclosure. I'm following the exact same path as you too, want the Shopbot Desktop but went ahead and bought a Shapeoko 3 to see if it will work for my needs.

Just found this green glue noise proofing stuff at my Habitat Restore today so picked up the compound and sealant for $2 a tube. Now I come home and find this thread.

Keep up the great build thread, really enjoying seeing it come together.
Shapeoko 3 #109
Routakit HD Beta #001

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by tjshape » Sun Jan 04, 2015 1:58 am

Atonwa wrote:This is great, can't wait to see the finished enclosure. I'm following the exact same path as you too, want the Shopbot Desktop but went ahead and bought a Shapeoko 3 to see if it will work for my needs.

Just found this green glue noise proofing stuff at my Habitat Restore today so picked up the compound and sealant for $2 a tube. Now I come home and find this thread.

Keep up the great build thread, really enjoying seeing it come together.
Welcome to the world of CNC! I seriously wish I had pulled the trigger on getting one of these machines long ago.
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by tjshape » Sun Jan 04, 2015 2:15 am

So, this thing started getting VERY big and VERY heavy. My original thought was to put it on some sort of garage shelving, but being that at this point I could barely lift the thing and I was not even close to being done, I decided it was instead going to be placed on a mobile base. I had some spare heavy duty casters laying around, so my next step was to build the base itself. Again, I opted for 2x4 construction. I made the base height (with casters) to be almost exactly inline with my 4x8 feed/work table where I had been assembling the piece to make it simple to slide off the work table right onto the base. Had I not done this, I would have needed some extra muscle to move the thing onto the base. Had I to do it over again, I might have built the base first, then the enclosure on top of the base so then I wouldn't have had to worry about it.

Here is a picture of the cabinet resting on the new base. I apologize for the garage clutter - I've since cleaned and reorganized everything. I Promise. ;)
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Enclosure Base with enclosure
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Having the enclosure mobile at this point was fantastic as I was easily able to reposition it to work on any of the sides (and also push it out of the way when I wasn't working on it).

With the base built, it was time to finish framing in and drywalling this part of the enclosure. I continued using Green Glue whenever mounting any of the drywall. In this picture (and the last one) you'll also notice the little red box - that is a router variable speed controller I bought for the DW660 and I was playing around with where I might mount it.
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Main enclosure all drywalled.
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Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by tjshape » Sun Jan 04, 2015 2:36 am

So now it was time to build the door. Up to this point, I hadn't put too much thought into the door, thinking it would just sort of happen on it's own. This stalled the enclosure process a bit as I contemplated what to use for the door. I had been going back and forth about having a viewing window or using a webcam. With a viewing window, my main concern was noise escaping from the window being that there would be no possible way I could insulate it nearly as well as I did the walls, floor and ceiling of the enclosure itself. After thinking about this for awhile though I decided that having a viewing window outweighed the noise concerns.

Once the viewing window was a definite, then it was time to decide how to build it so it would block out as much sound as possible. I had considered buying an actual window with double or triple pane glass filled with argon, but opted instead for 2 18"x24" acrylic panels. I went with two panels to create a space between the two panels to again help with the sound escaping. The other nice thing about having the two panels is I am much less concerned about looking directly at the machine through the window should a bit break and fly off at one of the panels, potentially breaking it. Chances of it breaking both panels are largely reduced or eliminated.

For the construction of the door, I chose to use 2x4s again and framed it in similar to how I framed the enclosure itself.
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Door for enclosure
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front view of door
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For the door in the end, the construction layers went like so (from outside to inside):
1. Drywall
2. Green Glue
3. Soundboard
4. Outer Plexiglass
5. weather stripping around edges of outer plexiglass
6. 2x4s/insulation
7. weather stripping around edges of inner plexiglass
8. Inner plexiglass
9. Soundboard
10. Green glue
11. Drywall

Like the enclosure, the door was also extremely heavy. To mount it on the enclosure, I rested the door on my work/feed table and lined up the now mobile enclosure next to it. To fasten the door to the cabinet I used three of the most heavy duty door hinges I could find.
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Door mounted on enclosure
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In that picture, I have the window taped as I getting ready for paint. I also placed the Shapeoko inside the enclosure for some perspective.
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

Brian Stone
Posts: 295
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2014 1:52 am
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by Brian Stone » Sun Jan 04, 2015 2:54 am

Really great job. That box looks like it could silence a Foo Fighters concert. :D
Shapeoko 2 #7353
1500x1000mm Shapeoko/X-Carve Hybrid, Nema-23's, Belt-Driven Z-Axis /w ACME Screw, Dewalt 611, Soundproof Enclosure
[Fusion 360 | Illustrator] -> Universal G-Code Sender

tjshape
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:59 am
Location: Madison, WI

Re: tjshape's build log

Post by tjshape » Sun Jan 04, 2015 2:59 am

Next, because in my infinite wisdom, I miscalculated the door width measurement by a small amount, I needed to flush it out with the cabinet so I could mount a draw latch which would be used to ensure the door would seal tight. I won't be winning any beauty contests with this one in the end.
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draw latch
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With the latch in place, it was off to paint. I decided to use plastidip instead of paint. I don't exactly know why - probably because I had a bunch of cans laying around. If anything, the plastidip would seal some of the remaining gaps (if I missed any with the green glue sealant).
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painted
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With the interior and door all plastidipped (I didn't both doing anything to the sides/top/back), I mounted the brightest under cabinet LED light strip I could find so I could see inside. This was a great add-on, which I would consider a necessity. At this point, I also put weatherstripping around where the door would hit to enclosure so it would create a nice seal when the draw latch was closed.

With this all done, it was time to work on the electrical.
Shapeoko 2, ACME upgrade, Belt Drive Z-Axis upgrade, Dewalt DW660

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