carving two sides easily

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sjp770
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carving two sides easily

Post by sjp770 » Tue May 20, 2014 9:12 am

Just wondering what the process used in this video at 6 mins is? I'd search for it but I have now idea what its called.
[youtube]BLD4dFoXC7o[/youtube]

And what cad / cam programs support it?
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BLD4dFoXC7o

sjp770
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by sjp770 » Tue May 20, 2014 10:45 am

"As far as the outline goes, just divide each side by 4 and jog in and out the width of the kerf... That's it!"

cvoinescu
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by cvoinescu » Tue May 20, 2014 10:46 am

At 6:00, he's in the middle of a profiling operation. The only thing unusual here is that he uses the clamped stock as a fixture for the workpiece, so that it's still registered when he turns it over. In production, this is done with registration pins (if the part permits) or with fixtures. The fixture can be milled on the same mill as the workpiece, but it would usually be a cheap material (MDF); or it can be as simple as a fixed edge or corner against which the part is aligned.
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zerblatt007
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by zerblatt007 » Tue May 20, 2014 11:39 am

I have to say, this "the integrated flip geometry" method was very neat.
Have to try this at some point.. :)
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WillAdams
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by WillAdams » Tue May 20, 2014 11:59 am

Yeah, it makes me wish that instead I had sourced a side vise which would move both of the jaws equally so that I could put the zero for one axis along that center.
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zerblatt007
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by zerblatt007 » Tue Jul 08, 2014 11:26 am

Yep, works nicely.. :)

Image

At least for 2cm HDPE.
WillAdams wrote:Yeah, it makes me wish that instead I had sourced a side vise which would move both of the jaws equally so that I could put the zero for one axis along that center.
Have you found something like that anywhere?
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WillAdams
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by WillAdams » Tue Jul 08, 2014 11:55 am

I haven't found any centering side vises at a cost which makes sense for my machine --- they've all been ~$200+, some have been in the thousands.

I guess I'll make one out of a Jorgensen wood clamp.
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Woodworker
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by Woodworker » Tue Jul 08, 2014 1:44 pm

I'm confused, again, couldn't you use a vise with a fixed jaw and just zero from one corner of the fixed jaw? As long as the vise face is parallel to one of the axes, repeatability should be possible. I think there is one regular forum member that has one mounted permanently to his spill board and has a WCS based off of one corner.
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WillAdams
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by WillAdams » Tue Jul 08, 2014 1:54 pm

Yes, but that then requires that one measures each piece if they're variable in thickness if one is planning on putting centered holes in it --- having a centering vise would allow one to just mount the piece and cut and not have to worry 'bout whether or no one measured accurately, the cuts would be on center.
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veng1
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Re: carving two sides easily

Post by veng1 » Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:20 pm

The T-Tech commercial PCB mill has one fixed .125" hole for a tooling pin and a similar sized long slot aligned with it and parallel to the long axis of the machine. Consequently, it fits almost any size material.

To use it, one puts the material on a support, for instance a block of wood bigger than the target material, and drills a first hole that tightly fits the locating pin. Then a second hole is drilled basically as far away as possible at a more or less random location but along the longest axis of the final board. Both holes are eyeball close to the center of the board. Tooling pins are inserted through the two holes and into the table which affixes the location of the material with respect to the axes. The material is cut and then turned over and reinstalled in the hole and slot. Thus, the material is still accurately located, just upside down. Then the cuts are made on the second side and the material is cut-out from the blank. It is always necessary to cut the final piece out from the blank as the sides of the blank are not parallel to the circuitry because the holes were drilled somewhat randomly. By cutting it out, the sides are then located parallel(or whatever intended angle) to the circuitry.

One way to think of it, the hole sets the location in the X-Y coordinate space and the slot sets the angle of the material. When turned over, they are still in the same location and angle.

I've done numerous PCBs using this machine and the locations are exact as long as the holes are tight. So no dull drills or significant run-out. Or use roll pins that have some spring.

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