Tooling Sale

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samc99us
Posts: 270
Joined: Mon Nov 11, 2013 5:20 pm

Tooling Sale

Post by samc99us » Thu Jan 21, 2016 7:42 pm

Just an alert MSC is having a sale on tooling, 35% off today, code CTB35H. That's a pretty darn good deal and I should have slapped more onto my order. As is it saved me $20 on one end mill (5 degree tapered end mill).

http://www.mscdirect.com/browse/Milling ... d=12106227
Modified Shapeoko 2: 1500mm fully supported y-axis, 1000 mm 4060 x-axis, ACME Belt Drive Z-axis, Dewalt DNP611, full aluminum t-slot table, 4x NEMA23 180 oz/in stepper motors driven by a G540

CastIrony
Posts: 650
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2014 10:21 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Tooling Sale

Post by CastIrony » Thu Jan 21, 2016 9:57 pm

Somewhat offtopic: I haven't yet developed a good sense for why similar-looking end mills made out of the 'same' material (e.g. 'solid carbide, uncoated') have wildly different prices depending on where you get them.

I'm sure there often is a difference, whether from design or quality of materials or different manufacturing techniques or better tolerances or whatever, but none of that seems to be conveyed in product listings that I can tell. It's hard enough some times searching for easy stuff like shank diameter or helix angle.

Is it safe to always assume that more money = better? Is a $30 mill going to be worth not getting two 'equivalent' $15 mills?
Shapeoko 3 #192 - Complete! Needs limit switches.

sgth0mas
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Dec 12, 2015 5:57 pm

Re: Tooling Sale

Post by sgth0mas » Thu Jan 21, 2016 11:17 pm

CastIrony wrote:Somewhat offtopic: I haven't yet developed a good sense for why similar-looking end mills made out of the 'same' material (e.g. 'solid carbide, uncoated') have wildly different prices depending on where you get them.

I'm sure there often is a difference, whether from design or quality of materials or different manufacturing techniques or better tolerances or whatever, but none of that seems to be conveyed in product listings that I can tell. It's hard enough some times searching for easy stuff like shank diameter or helix angle.

Is it safe to always assume that more money = better? Is a $30 mill going to be worth not getting two 'equivalent' $15 mills?
Coatings, grade of carbide, tolerances, research into cutting geometry and other factors typically drive cost.

More expensive isnt always better (i have some $50+ tapered bits that i would say were way overpriced given the life), but cheap is strongly correlated with lower quality. It really depends on the use.

Ive been using O flutes from amana lately and those are definitely worth the price. I wish i had this sale when i bought several of them.

Thanks for posting this OP

samc99us
Posts: 270
Joined: Mon Nov 11, 2013 5:20 pm

Re: Tooling Sale

Post by samc99us » Fri Jan 22, 2016 1:07 pm

I can't really answer the question either, on what makes a more expensive tool drastically better. Certainly coatings play a factor. For most of what I do, the tools I buy from Lakeshore are just fine and they now have two flute TiCN (aluminum compatible) cutters for ~$15. All my lakeshore tools measure a little bit under but are generally close-0.123" for a 0.125" end mill for example, whereas the cheaper ebay tools and inventables end mills are more like 0.117" for a 0.125" cutter.

I went to MSC for a specialty tool, an SGS end mill: http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/03280849

I hope this isn't a bad tool, but the type of cut I will be using this for is a one-off deal basically, and I'm not loading the tool in a slot, so it should be fine if I treat it nicely!
Modified Shapeoko 2: 1500mm fully supported y-axis, 1000 mm 4060 x-axis, ACME Belt Drive Z-axis, Dewalt DNP611, full aluminum t-slot table, 4x NEMA23 180 oz/in stepper motors driven by a G540

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