3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko parts

cvoinescu
Posts: 4442
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:50 pm
Location: Camberley, UK
Contact:

3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko parts

Post by cvoinescu » Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:38 pm

I need a more compact 3D printer than the eShapeoko, so I'm building one out of parts that I already have. It's a prototype built out of whatever I had to hand, plus £5 worth of purpose-bought parts, so there are some compromises. Enjoy the pictorial. :)

NP-Front.png
NP-Front.png (928.13 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
Work volume should be at least 200 mm x 250 mm x 200 mm (about 8" x 10" x 8"). All four pieces of MakerSlide are the same size, 375 mm. The 20x40 T-slot pieces are 440 mm long. This version uses three of them, but the final version will need just two.

NP-Front-closeup.png
NP-Front-closeup.png (991.8 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
The printer uses standard MakerSlide carriage plates for X and Y, and two small MakerSlide carriage plates for the gantry ends.

NP-Back.png
NP-Back.png (823.51 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
The X and Y axes use MXL belt loops, with a motor at one end and an idler at the other end. The Z axis is screw-driven. The Y rail is attached to the bottom of the frame with four M3 bolts and insertion nuts.

NP-X-belt.png
NP-X-belt.png (738 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
The X and Y carriages and drive systems are identical, except the Y belt is longer and the motor and idler further apart. The belt is closed with eShapeoko belt clips, and a bad Shapeoko/eShapeoko lead nut attaches it to the carriage plate. The belt is tensioned by moving the idler.

NP-gantry-detail.png
NP-gantry-detail.png (937.91 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
The gantry ends are bolted to the MakerSlide using Misumi self-tapping screws. The same screws are used to construct the frame. For the frame, the horizontal members have holes for access to the heads of the screws. The head of the screw is shaped to fit into the T-slot. This method is cheaper than brackets and just as solid, but it requires access holes. They are very easy to drill, though, and no great accuracy is needed.

NP-Z-screw.png
NP-Z-screw.png (797.15 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
The Z axis is driven by two stainless steel M6 x 1 mm threaded rods, about 400 mm long. The 1 mm lead is ideal for 3-D printing. The M6 rod is flexible enough to prevent binding if alignment is not perfect. To prevent whipping, the rods are held at both ends.

NP-Z-motor.png
NP-Z-motor.png (785.23 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
The Z threaded rods are attached to the motors with rigid couplers. This coupler is a #10 spacer, drilled out to 5 mm at one end and 5.9 mm at the other end. It is glued to the rod with J B Weld, and tightened on the motor shaft with a shaft collar (actually, a sawed-off aluminum MXL pulley that was bad).

If you look at the X motor, you can see why the motors are on spacers, and not bolted directly to the brackets: there needs to be room for the heads of the screws that fix the bracket to the extrusion. The bracket is an eShapeoko Z motor plate, which was designed to be used with the motor on very long spacers.

NP-Z-nut.png
NP-Z-nut.png (931.94 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
Again a bad Shapeoko lead nut, with a M6 cross dowel embedded in it. For the next version, I got M6 brass inserts for plastic. Because the motor brackets hold the motors at the wrong distance from the rail, there are a few nylon washers between the nut and the MakerSlide (the spacers at the front are there simply because I did not have the correct screw length).

NP-Z-bearing.png
NP-Z-bearing.png (892.3 KiB) Viewed 5354 times
To keep it from whipping, the top of the screw is held by the flanged bearing dropped into yet another EM-LZP. A spacer and some aluminum tape adapts the diameter. This bearing does not bear any weight: the entire weight of the gantry rests on the two Z motors, which is perfectly fine for Z axis of a 3-D printer. It's also possible to use a flanged bearing at the bottom to support the weight, with the motor connected using a flexible coupler, similar to the eShapeoko Z axis but upside down. The access holes for the self-tapping screws holding the frame together are clearly visible here (only one is used).
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

Auzze
Posts: 38
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:30 pm
Location: Ballarat, AU

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by Auzze » Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:22 pm

HI..

Very nice build..

Stuart
Shapeoko #1996F w/ double MakerSlide (500mm) X-Axis, (750mm) Y upgrades, Acme Screw Z-axis, ¼″ drive shaft, Outside belts, cable drag chain.

http://oz3dprint.info/

WillAdams
Posts: 8608
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:11 pm
Location: Pennsylvania --- south of the Turnpike, East of US-15
Contact:

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by WillAdams » Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:37 pm

I have got to do that.

Okay if I copy the photo and text into the wiki?
Shapeoko 3XL #0006 w/ Carbide Compact Router w/0.125″ and ¼″ Carbide 3D precision collets

MeanderBolt
Posts: 560
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:45 pm
Location: Georgia
Contact:

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by MeanderBolt » Thu Nov 28, 2013 1:12 am

Shallow depth of field, and shapely shiny metal... CNC porn.
Shapeoko 2 # 3569 - DW660
Current tool chain > Draftsight > CamBam > ChiliPeppr
Build log

WillAdams
Posts: 8608
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:11 pm
Location: Pennsylvania --- south of the Turnpike, East of US-15
Contact:

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by WillAdams » Thu Nov 28, 2013 1:55 am

Looking at it again, I have one question:

Could one instead (if one had room) simply rotate a ShapeOko 90 degrees (say bolting it to a wall) and re-orient an extruder and slip in a stationary heated bed?
Shapeoko 3XL #0006 w/ Carbide Compact Router w/0.125″ and ¼″ Carbide 3D precision collets

cvoinescu
Posts: 4442
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:50 pm
Location: Camberley, UK
Contact:

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by cvoinescu » Thu Nov 28, 2013 2:16 am

Auzze wrote:Very nice build..
Thank you.
WillAdams wrote:Okay if I copy the photo and text into the wiki?
Of course, please do.
MeanderBolt wrote:Shallow depth of field, and shapely shiny metal... CNC porn.
I aim to please. :)

By the way, it works, too. I've hooked it up to a spare control board (a RUMBA I got from Kickstarter), and all axes move just fine. I just need to add a bed, and mount my existing extruder, and I'm in business.
WillAdams wrote:Could one instead (if one had room) simply rotate a ShapeOko 90 degrees (say bolting it to a wall) and re-orient an extruder and slip in a stationary heated bed?
Sure, but then you're left with a belt-driven vertical axis with quite some weight on it. Do the obvious and replace the former Y drive with screws, and the former Z drive with a belt, and you're halfway to my configuration. The only problem is that vertical accuracy is very important in a 3-D printer, and a heavy extruder moving back and forth in a direction perpendicular to the gantry would twist the X carriage enough to cause problems. Having the Y axis attached to the frame rather than the X carriage avoids this problem entirely. A moving bed is an acceptable compromise, if the bed is relatively small.

For a larger machine, I am considering a different approach: take the X and Y of the Shapeoko, remove the Z and put the extruder directly on the X carriage, then have the Z lift all that (on two, or even four vertical rails). With two rails bolted to a wall, one can easily build a man-sized machine.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

deejayspinz
Posts: 96
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:33 am
Location: Burlington Ontario, Canada

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by deejayspinz » Thu Nov 28, 2013 6:36 pm

very nice.. wish I had spare parts like that laying around! :D

eagletree
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 5:15 pm
Location: Western Washington State

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by eagletree » Sat Jul 26, 2014 4:38 pm

Are there any pictures or documents on this after it was completed? I'm starting to get a lot of extra pieces, and a 3D printer would be very nice to have (so I stop bugging my son for all the ABS pieces I need). Thanks.

cvoinescu
Posts: 4442
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:50 pm
Location: Camberley, UK
Contact:

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by cvoinescu » Sat Jul 26, 2014 5:33 pm

The first prototype was an assemblage of whatever parts I had to hand, to test a few things I wasn't sure about (that the M6 threaded rod was flexible enough to absorb small alignment errors, but stiff enough not to whip at reasonable speed; and that the frame was rigid enough and reasonably easy to assemble and align). The only thing I'm not happy with is using three V-wheels for the carriages. They're better with four, especially for the Y (the bed).

I had laser-cut parts made for a second prototype. They're designed specifically for it, and they fix a few (expected) problems with the first prototype. Everything should fit together without awkward spacers and stacks of washers. I haven't had a chance to assemble that second prototype, though... When I do, I'll report here.

If you'd like more detail about the first prototype, the one that uses re-purposed eShapeoko parts, just ask.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

eagletree
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 5:15 pm
Location: Western Washington State

Re: 3-D printer based on MakerSlide, built using eShapeoko p

Post by eagletree » Sat Jul 26, 2014 5:38 pm

Thanks for that.

No, I don't really need to take any action on it now, I can get by with my sons affinity. It was just starting to seem like I'm collecting a lot of extra parts and having a printer dedicated to what I'm doing would be nice. Are you going to be selling components if you achieve a printer you are satisfied with?

Post Reply