Help wiring an SSR and a switch for Spindle

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PsyKo
Posts: 430
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 8:42 pm
Location: France

Help wiring an SSR and a switch for Spindle

Post by PsyKo » Thu Aug 01, 2013 7:22 am

Hello,

I'm completely renewing my electronic enclosure, and I would like to add an SSR (http://www.gotronic.fr/art-relais-wga5-6d25z-4115.htm) to control my Kress.
As far as I understand, wiring an SSR is like displayed on the image below (made with paint, sorry :) ) :
SSR.png
SSR.png (5.54 KiB) Viewed 2132 times
Am I correct ?

I'm having problem now, due to my lack of knowledge in electronic. I would like to add a switch to it so I can turn the spindle on/off with the switch. How would I wire that ?
Here is the use case I see, but maybe it's too complicated :
- Spindle is off, TinyG spindle control is off, and turning the switch to On will turn the spindle on (standard),
- Spindle is on, TinyG spindle control is off, and turning the switch to Off will turn the spindle off (standard),
- Spindle is off, TinyG spindle control is on, and turning the switch to On will turn the spindle on,
- Spindle is on, TinyG spindle control is on, and turning the switch to Off will turn the spindle off (some kind of safety, beside the estop button),

I'd also like to add a led to it, to display the state of TinyG spindle status, but I think this will be simply wire on the TinyG On/Off port.

Thanks for the help.
Shapeoko #736
Kress 800, Z Axis upgrade, dual Y, 600mm X&Y rails, metal spacers and V Wheels, home switches, 4th axis
Goko - Free CNC Control Software - http://www.shapeoko.com/forum/viewtopic ... 380#p44380

zerblatt007
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Re: Help wiring an SSR and a switch for Spindle

Post by zerblatt007 » Thu Aug 01, 2013 9:14 am

I connected mine like this:
SSR3.png
SSR3.png (8.39 KiB) Viewed 2123 times
Off is now in the middle in the three position toggle switch.
Next time I will probably use two switches, but this was easiest the first time around.
Shapeoko #958: Dual-Y drive, Double-X, Belt on outside, 1m Y-Axis, Acme Z, Opened up and boxed in. Kress 1050 Spindle.

cvoinescu
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Re: Help wiring an SSR and a switch for Spindle

Post by cvoinescu » Thu Aug 01, 2013 10:57 am

What zerblatt007 did, except I'm pretty sure you don't need the resistor, and the convention for that kind of switch is OFF -- AUTO -- ON, rather than off in the middle. Especially if it's a toggle switch, you need to be able to turn it off easily, without having to be careful to stop at the middle position -- so OFF must be at one end. That requires a true three-position switch, not the type that has no contact in the middle position.

Pure nitpicking: in Europe, brown is a phase (line, "hot") color. Neutral is always blue, any other solid color is line. Brown is the usual choice when there's only one phase; three phases are brown, black, grey (in this order). Switched line can be any color (except blue). Earth is always striped green/yellow. It's best to wire your equipment using the right colors. It helps prevent nasty accidents. If you don't have the right color (for example, you're wiring a switch with a piece of cable, using the blue wire for switched phase), put a piece of sleeve of the correct color on each end of the wire.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

regressedEE
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Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 9:58 pm

Re: Help wiring an SSR and a switch for Spindle

Post by regressedEE » Thu Aug 01, 2013 12:25 pm

Not sure if this will help, but I used this article as the basis for my SSR remote switch: Tom Benedict Builds a Relay Box for His Taig CNC Mill.

PsyKo
Posts: 430
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 8:42 pm
Location: France

Re: Help wiring an SSR and a switch for Spindle

Post by PsyKo » Fri Aug 02, 2013 11:49 am

Thanks for the answers.
I'll try and wire it this weekend.

By the way, I plan to use my aluminium enclosure (http://www.shapeoko.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=1922). Any idea on how to secure it ? Secure it = avoid aluminium being source of short circuits or being "electrized" ?
Tie the enclosure to the ground should fix it I think, right ?
Shapeoko #736
Kress 800, Z Axis upgrade, dual Y, 600mm X&Y rails, metal spacers and V Wheels, home switches, 4th axis
Goko - Free CNC Control Software - http://www.shapeoko.com/forum/viewtopic ... 380#p44380

cvoinescu
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Re: Help wiring an SSR and a switch for Spindle

Post by cvoinescu » Fri Aug 02, 2013 1:33 pm

The rule is: any one single failure should not electrocute you. There are more rules that work to that end. For example:
  • Conductive enclosures should be connected to ground/earth. If parts of a conductive enclosure (e.g. a lid or a door) aren't guaranteed to make a good contact with the rest of the enclosure at all times, they should have their own ground/earth connection. If a short-circuit happens between a live wire and the enclosure, a fuse somewhere should blow before the voltage on the enclosure becomes dangerous. That's why any earth should be a good earth.
  • No live wire or part should rely on solder alone for mechanical integrity. It's a good idea to extend this to any type of contact (crimp, screw): if a wire works itself free, it shouldn't be able to touch anything that's not supposed to be live. You can secure the wires with cable ties or clips; or, for spade connectors, you can put a long, heat-shrinkable sleeve on the spade and a good few centimeters of wire too. Commercial devices also use a goo to hold things in place (I'm sure you've seen it). Hot glue and solder are not good enough, because the device needs to remain safe if it overheats, and, at least for a short while, if it's on fire.
  • Any live part or wire that can come into contact with parts that a user can touch must be double insulated (e.g. individual wire insulation, plus cord jacket; or, inside the case, individual wire insulation, plus sleeve) or provided with reinforced insulation (not sure exactly what that means; presumably something that's not as easy to damage as vinyl or rubber).
  • On a PCB, there should be a large gap between live parts and parts that can come in contact with the user. I don't remember how wide is has to be, but I remember this: if the PCB is lacquered (e.g. solder resist), a standard optocoupler (0.3" wide) has its pins far enough to satisfy this requirement; if it isn't, that gap is not enough for 230 V (but I think 0.4" wide parts are OK).
This list is by no means complete, and the "rules" are my interpretation of my recollection of stuff I've read on the Internet -- but they should be a good start.
Proud owner of ShapeOko #709, eShapeOko #0, and of store.amberspyglass.co.uk

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